menu

Ai Build implements AI to detect and correct 3D printing errors in real time

Published on June 11, 2019 by Carlota V.
Ai Build 3D printing errors

We reported only yesterday on Inkbit’s new 3D printer – it is powered by machine vision and learning systems to correct printing errors in real time and to predict the warping behaviour of materials. Similarly, the London-based startup, Ai Build, just unveiled its new real-time inspection technology for additive manufacturing using computer vision and machine learning.

An obstacle to large-scale 3D printing are production defects, therefore Ai Build’s technology will prove beneficial as it will automatically detect the most common printing issues, such as material shrinkage and warping in real time. As we know, additive manufacturing technologies were mostly used for rapid prototyping or low-volume production until recently. However, this is changing as predicted by multiple reports on the state of AM in the last few months. We are now entering an age where large-scale 3D printing could become the norm for certain industries or products – new technologies are therefore necessary and artificial intelligence is likely to play an important role.

Example of production defects such as overextrusion or underextrusion | Photo Credits: AiBuild

Ai Build is the startup working towards providing a completely autonomous large-scale 3D printing technology to produce their designs at their own facilities. They also help other businesses to set up their manufacturing environment, give initial training and provide technical support. So, what are the benefits of this new technology? As mentioned above it is a real-time detection of 3D printing defects with artificial intelligence technology. It should increase productivity and level automation in additive manufacturing facilities and at the same time reduce production costs and material waste. Their AiMaker, the high-precision robotic end-effector that attaches to industrial robotic arms is now embedded with a camera and GPU module that detects manufacturing defects by comparing its real-time camera view to previously recorded images of 3D printed parts.

Other examples of 3D printing defects | Photo Credits: AiBuild

We have a simple rule at Ai Build: If a product is faulty, we repeat production. If it has a small defect, we repeat. If we are slightly in doubt, we repeat. This level of perfection in additive manufacturing usually comes at a high cost, in the form of excessive labour and material waste. The milestone we are announcing today is a result of our obsession for flawless production and a major leap towards fully automated, autonomous factories of the future. We are excited to see how the productivity of our users will increase with this advanced technology”, explains Daghan Cam, CEO of Ai Build.

Users of the new AiMaker will be able to get instant notifications about the quality of their 3D printed parts through the AiSync cloud software. Leonidas Leonidou, AiBuild’s Head of Applied Research added, “By detecting printing defects in real time, our AI technology offers the potential of automating quality control, while at the same time acting as a form of feedback to the designer about the printability of their design and how such printing issues could be eliminated in future prints.

Ai Build will start shipping its new generation 3D printers with computer vision capability on the second half of the year. You can find more information HERE.

What do you think of this new technology? Let us know in a comment below or on our Facebook and Twitter pages! Sign up for our free weekly Newsletter, all the latest news in 3D printing straight to your inbox!

Share Your Thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

de_DEen_USes_ESfr_FR
Stay Updated
Every wednesday, receive a recap of the latest 3D printing news straight to your inbox.
Our website uses cookies. By using our website and agreeing to this policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy. Know more about cookies OK