menu

3DGence showed the evolution of 3D materials at Formnext 2018

Published on November 21, 2018 by Michelle J.
3Dgence

Poland has become the cradle of many of the current main European manufacturers and key players. Not only when looking to desktop machines, but also for the industry itself. And it is in this sector in which the Polish company 3DGence has seen an opportunity as well. During the recently held Formnext, the manufacturer of 3D printers has shown us, its main innovations for the industrial sector.

The company belonging to the Michał Sołowow Group, has specialised in double extrusion 3D printers  with its: INDUSTRY F340 and its 3DGence DOUBLE P255; in addition to the 3DGence ONE, a single extruder 3D printer. To reaffirm its growth, during the third edition of the fair, the company 3DGence showed its new development of industrial materials for its machines and a robotic arm that demonstrates the capacity of its 3D printers.

3Dgence

Stand of the company within the latest edition of Formnext

3Dgence

3DGence INDUSTRY F340 3D Printer

New materials for the industry?

One of the great themes within Formnext 2018 was the evolution of 3D printing materials. The industrial filament market has grown with 217% in the last two years according to the study by the Belgian company Filaments.Discover from earlier this year. That is why more and more companies are betting on the technology of molten deposition at the industrial level. A technology that is being reinforced more and more in the development of final pieces.

To follow the trend of the 3D printing sector, the Polish manufacturer unveiled its first soluble filament for ABS . This support material allows to print pieces with advanced geometries guaranteeing a better finish. “We know, that industrial applications require the easiest solutions,” said Mateusz Sidorowicz, 3DGence Marketing Director. This material is compatible with your 3DGence INDUSTRY F340.

3Dgence

New soluble filament for ABS

3DGence presented a new filament of PEEK thermoplastic that can be printed in two variants: amorphous or crystalline. This high performance material was developed for your 3DGence INDUSTRY F340, printer chosen among our favourites to print PEEK and Ultem that are able to create durable and resistant parts.

A 3D printed robotic arm with 3DGence technology

To test the potential of its machines and materials, 3Dgence presented a robotic arm developed by its research and development department during the fair. Created completely with 3D printed pieces, this arm made of ABS and PLA demonstrates the capacity of the industrial machine of the brand for different industrial solutions.

3dgence

Robotic arm created with 3D printed parts

We have built a 120 kg robotic arm with great repeatability of movement. We wanted to test the capabilities of 3DGence 3D printers and I can confirm that we tested the usability of FDM technology in the prototyping process, “said Przemysław Wolnicki, 3DGence Development Manager.

To demonstrate equally the potential of its machines, the company offers the possibility of requesting a free sample of a piece printed in 3D with its technology. The user can choose between three different models of PEEK. That will allow you to check the strength and durability of a piece created with these technologies, and with the machines of the European manufacturer. Basically you can choose one of the three models prepared, including the PEEK helical compound gear,  the PC-ABS brake caliper and the ABS indexing gear

3Dgence

3D printed piece that you can request for free

To learn more about the developments of this Polish company you can visit its official website here.

What do you think about the new developments of 3DGence?  Let us know what you think in a comment below or on our Facebook and Twitter pages! Don’t forget to sign up for our free weekly Newsletter, with all the latest news in 3D printing delivered straight to your inbox!

Share Your Thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

de_DEen_USes_ESfr_FR
Stay Updated
Every wednesday, receive a recap of the latest 3D printing news straight to your inbox.
Our website uses cookies. By using our website and agreeing to this policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy. Know more about cookies OK